first_imgMANCHESTER, England (AP): Pep Guardiola sat with his arms folded, frustration clearly building inside him. The Manchester City manager was fielding another question about the seemingly uncertain future of Sergio Aguero and could not disguise his displeasure. “I spoke 10 times about that. Ten times. You know my opinion,” Guardiola said, snappily. “He is so happy. I am so happy. We are happy. 10 times I answer. No more please.” Unfortunately for Guardiola, there’s little hope of the Aguero talk dying down. Not when the striker is fuelling the conversation himself. Aguero had just scored two goals for the second straight game in City’s 5-1 win over Huddersfield in the FA Cup on Wednesday when he addressed his future at a club where he is regarded as a great. Despite proclamations from the club that it wants him to stay, Aguero said he has yet to receive such assurances in person. “One thing is that the club officially says it and another thing is to tell me,” Aguero said. “My intention is to stay. The club can say what it wants but in June they will have to meet with me.” Aguero’s future is shrouded in doubt because he lost his place in the team to new signing Gabriel Jesus, a 19-year-old Brazil striker. For four straight games, Aguero started among the substitutes, getting a few minutes here and there as his new teammate slotted seamlessly into City’s attack and scored three goals. It was an unusual situation for Aguero, one of the world’s most highly regarded strikers. He only got his place back in City’s team because Gabriel Jesus broke a bone in his foot against Bournemouth, which will rule him out for most of the rest of the season. Aguero’s future will likely be sorted out in the offseason, and he won’t be satisfied with starting the 2017-18 campaign as City’s second-choice striker. The return of Aguero, however, has coincided with some strong attacking showings from City, which have scored 10 goals in their last two games entertaining victories over Monaco in the Champions League and then Huddersfield. Aguero is working harder off the ball, something Guardiola has demanded of him, and demonstrating his typical potency in front of goal. “It’s (getting) much better and that makes me confident,” Guardiola said. “We are far away from the first game in the Premier League.” That was against Sunderland at Etihad Stadium, and City needed an 87th-minute own-goal to scrape a 2-1 victory. Seven months later, the teams meet again tomorrow, with City in third place and Sunderland in last. It will be a good yardstick as to City’s progress under Guardiola. “We are in a good moment now,” said Guardiola, whose team is unbeaten in eight games, “but we have to repeat every single game, again and again.”last_img read more


first_img1 Crystal Palace are locked in a four-way battle for Angers striker Famara Diedhiou.The 24-year-old managed eight goals in Ligue 1 last season and clubs are now exploring the possibility of signing him.Crystal Palace are keen on the Senegal international but, according to L’Equipe, they face plenty of competition.Indeed, as well as the Eagles, Freiburg, Malaga and Udinese are all chasing Diedhiou too.The four clubs are now expected to compete for the striker’s signature with Angers ready to do a deal at the right price. Famara Diedhiou last_img read more


first_imgThere is no sexism in U.S. academic science, argue researchers well versed on the controversial topic in a new paper and an op-ed yesterday in The New York Times. That’s a bunch of BS, say bloggers and others who follow the issue.The paper, by psychologists Stephen Ceci and Wendy Williams of Cornell University and economists Donna Ginther of the University of Kansas and Shulamit Kahn of Boston University, says the chronic underrepresentation of women in math-intensive fields is not due to discrimination, but rather their own employment preferences. The women working in those fields, they add, “have equivalent access to tenure-track academic jobs … persist and are remunerated at comparable rates.”Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)In their op-ed, Williams and Ceci seem to be trying to end the long-running debate. “Our country desperately needs more talented people in these fields. … But the unwelcoming image of the sexist academy isn’t helping,” they write.Not surprisingly, many find that argument seriously flawed. Science bloggers Emily Willingham and PZ Myers, for example, say it is ludicrous to blame women for choosing to avoid environments in which they are not welcome. They also say that some of the data in the paper about pay, publications, and other metrics of success fail to support the argument of a level playing field in academia. “Academic science is sexist: We do have a problem here,” Willingham asserts.last_img read more