first_imgAll systems are a go in the construction of the new Dawson Creek Calvin Kruk Centre for Arts.Friday morning, the city of Dawson Creek held a ribbon cutting ceremony, signifying the beginning of the renovation process, converting the historic downtown post office into the brand new centre for arts.- Advertisement -The tender for the construction of the centre was awarded to a lower mainland company named Preview Builders International INC, who presented a bid of $8,863,984 to the Dawson Creek City Council on March 16.According to Dawson Creek Mayor Mike Bernier, construction has already begun and the city estimates the centre will be completed by December, 2011.Mayor Bernier, who has been involved in the entire four year development process, says the new centre will be very beneficial to the city of Dawson Creek.[asset|aid=3575|format=mp3player|formatter=asset_bonus|title=34213fe2408f4e5eff019bb4bcf6bc5f-Mayor Bernier_1_Pub.mp3]  Advertisement The Calvin Kruk Centre for Arts is being built in hounor of Calvin Kruk, the late mayor of Dawson Creek.last_img read more


first_imgNatural gas is being touted as the climate-friendlier fuel that the United States can use to wean itself off coal, which releases twice the amount of carbon dioxide as natural gas when burned. But the surge of cheap natural gas may not do much to reduce long-term U.S. emissions of carbon dioxide, a new study suggests, because it could delay the deployment of cleaner renewable energy sources such as solar and wind.”If you have lots of cheap natural gas available, ultimately it’s not fighting only against coal but renewables, too,” says Steven Davis, an energy scientist at the University of California, Irvine, and co-author of the study, published online today in Environmental Research Letters.For their analysis, the authors developed scenarios of what the future mix of energy sources might look like in the United States, based on factors including cost and technology availability. In part, they drew on forecasts of future U.S. natural gas supplies developed by 23 experts in academia, industry, and finance; the forecasts ran the gamut from bullish to bearish. The researchers next ran those numbers through an optimization model that produced a likely energy mix.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)The results suggest that abundant natural gas will make little difference in lowering U.S. greenhouse gas emissions through 2055, because it will compete with and displace renewable energy sources. (This held true even if no methane were to escape from the natural gas infrastructure, an important issue because methane is a warming gas that is 120 times as potent as carbon dioxide.)”This is straightforward analysis that quantitatively shows what many have been very concerned about—that abundant natural gas will tend to suppress renewables,” says Andrew Rosenberg, director of the Center for Science and Democracy at the Union of Concerned Scientists in Cambridge, Massachusetts, who was not involved in the study.That may be true in the long run, but natural gas does appear to be helping the United States reduce emissions today, points out John Quigley, an alternative energy consultant in Harrisburg and former secretary of Pennsylvania’s Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, who was not involved in the study. By 2035, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) estimates that electricity generation from coal-fired power plants will drop to 34% of the U.S. energy mix (from 39% in 2013 and 52% in 2000), mostly due to cheap natural gas and retiring coal plants. And although solar is currently booming in the United States, EIA estimates renewables will cumulatively make up only 16% of electricity generation in 2040.Changes in U.S. climate policy—and not just in the supply and cost of fuels—will play a big role in accelerating or slowing shifts in the U.S. energy mix, Quigley and the authors agree. “Policy is everything,” Quigley says. “We need strong limits on emissions and policies that encourage renewables. We have to have comprehensive climate and energy policy that takes advantage of the resources that we have in this country.”last_img read more