first_imgThe home at 77 North Rd, Brighton, was once a church.Unique is a word often overused in real estate but this converted church is truly a one of a kind residence.The six-bedroom property at 77 North Rd, Brighton, is going under the hammer on Saturday, April 29 at 3pm.Marketing agent Kim Murdoch of Place Nundah said the former house of worship, on top of Brighton Hill, was a slice of heaven that had attracted “quite a bit” of interest.Murdoch said the current owners, a young couple, bought the 905sq m property with steepled church and separate Sunday school building 10 years ago.“When they bought it, it was a complete shell with nothing in it,” she said.The former church at 77 North Rd, Brighton.Now the church is a four-bedroom, two-bathroom home and the second building is a self-contained two-bedroom house with balcony.The main residence has polished timber floors, feature crisscross windows, gothic-shaped doors to the master bedroom, open plan living and a kitchen with breakfast bar.Outside there is a terrace area with travertine tiles and a timber deck.The second building has a man cave, two bedrooms, a kitchen, open plan living, a bathroom and garage parking for two cars.The Brighton home has a feature window next to the church steeple.Murdoch said the North Road home would suit a buyer looking for something different.“This is the third church I’ve marketed and I’ve found people who buy churches are normally extra special,” she said.“The churches have all been so different and, with the crisscross windows at the front, this one is very unique.”Also going to auction tomorrow is a three-bedroom bungalow that has belonged to the same owner since 1949.The home at 28 Solar St, Coorparoo.The home at 28 Solar St, Coorparoo will go under the hammer at 4.30pm on April 29.LJ Hooker Clayfield marketing agent Jason Gegg said the current owner bought the home with her husband after moving from Ingham 68 years ago.Her husband passed away 20 years ago and she remained, lovingly taking care of the property.More from newsMould, age, not enough to stop 17 bidders fighting for this home5 hours agoBuyers ‘crazy’ not to take govt freebies, says 28-yr-old investor5 hours agoGegg said the 95-year-old was selling to move in with her son.“The home is in a wonderful position — it has a reserve at the back — and has been really well looked after,” he said.“While some key rooms have been modernised over time the home has largely retained its authenticity.”The Solar St home has been lovingly maintained.The two-storey home has high ceilings, VJ panels and casement windows.Upstairs there are three bedrooms, a bathroom, kitchen, dining room and living room.Downstairs there is another living room, a second bathroom, a laundry and an office along with a garage and workshop.In Jindalee, a modern family home is going to auction at 11am on Saturday.The home at 138 Mount Ommaney Drive, JindaleeThe two-storey home at 138 Mount Ommaney Drive has four bedrooms, four bathrooms and parking for four cars.On the lower level there is a family room, storage rooms, a kitchenette, a bathroom and a laundry.Upstairs the open plan living, dining and kitchen opens to a covered deck at the front of the home and a terrace at the back.The Jindalee property has a modern floorplan including open living spaces.There is a built-in wood fire in the living room and the kitchen has a walk-in pantry, Siemens appliances, two built-in ovens, Teppanyaki cook plate, coffee machine and wine fridge.The master and second bedrooms have ensuites and all bedrooms have built-in robes, including a walk-in robe in the master.The property has an inground swimming pool, alarm system, water tanks and solar panels.Marketing agent Michael Devlin of More Estate Agents in Jindalee said the property was sophisticated and expansive and had views to Mount Coot-tha and Brisbane River.There are 116 home being auctioned across the wider Brisbane region this week on the back of 134 last week and a clearance rate of 44.3 per cent.CoreLogic auction spokesman, Kevin Brogan said Brisbane auction numbers had been impacted by the Easter long weekend followed by the unofficial Anzac Day long weekend.“The (post-Easter) bounce back nationally has been stronger this year than last year,” he said.“The powerhouse markets in Sydney and Melbourne had strong clearance rate activity but in Brisbane there are much more steady market behaviours.“The number of auction, at 116, is a decent number but fairly modest.”last_img read more


first_imgNOTTINGHAM, England (CMC) – Clive Lloyd, the last West Indies captain to taste World Cup glory, has insisted that the regional team need to make smarter decisions if they are to have an impact in the tournament.Lloyd, the legendary captain who won the 1975 and 1979 World Cups, made the comments following the Windies’ batting collapse against Australia on Thursday.The Windies were well-placed on 190 for four in the 35th over, chasing Australia’s total of 288, but lost five wickets for 66 runs to snatch defeat from the jaws of victory.Lloyd said he believed it was a game the West Indies should have easily won.“The West Indies team must start to play smart cricket because they have two real big games coming up against South Africa and England, therefore they have to be on top of their game as I’m sure they’d want to qualify,” he said.“I think on another day, with a better analysis of the situation they could have won that game and this would have given them the impetus to realise that they were serious contenders to qualify for the latter stages of this competition.”Lloyd said players needed to realise they were playing 50-over cricket and not T20.“The players have to realise that this is not Twenty20. The batsmen need to turn those scores of 30 and 40 into bigger scores and they must be aware that all these teams have world class bowlers at their disposal,” he said.He explained that their next match against South Africa was a crucial one in deciding whether they qualify for the knockout phase of the competition.Lloyd said it was important for the West Indies to put the loss against Australia behind them.“South Africa are up next and while they haven’t performed to their ability, Windies have to be aware of the job at hand, as South Africa are in danger of missing out on the top four if they lose.“They now have to re-group, look at the mistakes they made and rectify them so that they can return to their winning ways. I’m still feeling positive about the West Indies overall,” Lloyd revealed.“West Indies have to get all the disciplines right on the day and play clever cricket because for the most part of the day (against Australia) they did well, but they simply did not capitalise on the early dismissals.”last_img read more


first_imgSICHUA, CHINA — A north-central Iowa native now living in China encourages everybody to stay at home as much as they can to prevent the spread of coronavirus.Ian Schact graduated from Northwood-Kensett High School and Luther College, and eventually moved to China after being involved in the natural products trades business. He currently is in Sichua, about 800 miles from Wuhan, where the outbreak of COVID-19 began.Schact says at the start of the outbreak, he says many of the restrictions we are seeing here in the United States were happening in China.  “No public transportation, you weren’t allowed out, restrictions on movement, even from the community you are living in. Restrictions to one person every two days can leave an apartment and go out to get groceries. Shops were closed, and you couldn’t go out to dinner, there were no restaurants, no fast food, everything else was closed.”Schacht says the city went from bustling to a lockdown quickly which was surprising to see as an Iowa native.  “Over time some of these things have gotten better as the number of cases have gone down, but there was definitely a much bigger threat in those first few weeks when it started to get really bad.”Schacht says you may feel a little stir-crazy staying at home complying with the advisories of not being out and about, but he says this is the time to let the virus run its course and make you and your loved ones be safe. “I’ve told my parents to restrict the amount of travel you are doing, go shopping once a week, and enjoy the time you can working around the house, working at home, because once this is over, life will return back to normal, it just takes a while. If we don’t do that, what’s going to end up happening is we’re going to see an increase in cases that are not going to stop anytime soon.”Schacht says people should listen to then recommendations of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the World Health Organization, and local and state health officials.  “I think it’s very important to take this time to take a step back, stay safe, reduce travel, reduce parties, reduce gatherings, and really understand that the end is in sight, we just have to flatten that curve.”You can listen to our full interview with Ian Schacht by clicking on the audio player below:last_img read more