first_imgMirvac’s residential apartment development Ascot Green next to Eagle Farm racecourse.Mirvac general manager of residential in Queensland Warwick Bible said Ascot Green’s strong buyer appeal would almost certainly increase now that construction had officially started.More from newsMould, age, not enough to stop 17 bidders fighting for this home2 hours agoBuyers ‘crazy’ not to take govt freebies, says 28-yr-old investor8 hours ago“Demand to live in the well-established suburb of Ascot is already high and we expect this to continue as construction on Ascot House ramps up and the vision for Ascot Green as a residential masterplan starts to come to life,” Mr Bible said. “Civil works including external road works, site preparation and basement excavation are now well underway, and the foundations commenced in December 2016.” Ascot is a very in demand area with realestate.com.au reporting an average of 754 online visits per property listing compared to a Queensland average of 268 per property.Works have been approved for public parklands, bike paths, open green spaces and plans for public art to be exhibited in the communal outdoor areas. LtoR: Brisbane Racing Club chairman Neville Bell, Lord Mayor Graham Quirk and Mirvac general manager of residential in Queensland, Warwick Bible celebrate the start of construction on Ascot Green at Eagle Farm Racecourse.SALES are off and racing and the sod has officially been turned in stage one of the $950 million Ascot Green development at Eagle Farm Racecourse.With the official soil throwing taking place last week for the nine-storey Ascot House, the first residential tower out of the gates, sales are racing along with more than 60 per cent sold since its launch in July last year.Tower two, 12-storey Tulloch House is set to soon be released to the public with a one-bedroom apartment starting at $460,000. Mirvac’s residential apartment development Ascot Green next to Eagle Farm racecourse.Lord Mayor Graham Quirk said the residential development and overall revitalisation of the Eagle Farm precinct would help put the area on the map as a premier recreation and residential destination in Brisbane.“It is an exciting time for Brisbane, as construction commences on this landmark development which will provide approximately 1,000 trackside apartments as well as retail and commercial buildings that tie in with the area’s rich heritage,” Mr Quirk said.Brisbane Racing Club Chairman, Neville Bell, said there were plans in place for premium retail facilities and building of a new childcare centre was currently underway. “We’ve recently submitted a development application for a new shopping precinct in the area which would include eleven specialty retail stores and a major supermarket, further bolstering the area’s appeal,” Mr Bell said.“In addition, we currently have a new childcare centre on Lancaster Road under construction, and we are taking expressions of interest for an aged care facility in the area.”last_img read more


first_imgMcCOOL JUNCTION, Neb. (March 10) – IMCA Modified drivers run for $1,000 to win and a berth on the Fast Shafts All-Star Invitational ballot on the second night of Junction Motor Speedway’s March 18-19 Mike Chapin Memorial Spring Thaw.Karl Chevrolet Northern SportMods, IMCA Sunoco Stock Cars and IMCA Sunoco Hobby Stocks are also on both Saturday and Sunday cards.Modifieds, Northern SportMods and Stock Cars get $350 to win, Hobby Stocks $300 on Saturday, Northern SportMods get $850, Stock Cars and Hobby Stocks both $700 to win on Sunday.Top prize for Mach-1 Sport Compacts on Sunday is $200. IMCA Speedway Motors Weekly Racing National, regional and Allstar Performance State points will be awarded both nights.Pit gates open at 11 a.m., the grandstand opens at 2 p.m. and racing starts at 4 p.m. both days. Pit passes are $25 on Saturday and $30 on Sunday.More information is available by calling 402 773-5538, ext. 4. The Chapin Memorial Spring Thaw will be broadcast by IMCA.TV.last_img read more


first_imgNOTTINGHAM, England (CMC) – Clive Lloyd, the last West Indies captain to taste World Cup glory, has insisted that the regional team need to make smarter decisions if they are to have an impact in the tournament.Lloyd, the legendary captain who won the 1975 and 1979 World Cups, made the comments following the Windies’ batting collapse against Australia on Thursday.The Windies were well-placed on 190 for four in the 35th over, chasing Australia’s total of 288, but lost five wickets for 66 runs to snatch defeat from the jaws of victory.Lloyd said he believed it was a game the West Indies should have easily won.“The West Indies team must start to play smart cricket because they have two real big games coming up against South Africa and England, therefore they have to be on top of their game as I’m sure they’d want to qualify,” he said.“I think on another day, with a better analysis of the situation they could have won that game and this would have given them the impetus to realise that they were serious contenders to qualify for the latter stages of this competition.”Lloyd said players needed to realise they were playing 50-over cricket and not T20.“The players have to realise that this is not Twenty20. The batsmen need to turn those scores of 30 and 40 into bigger scores and they must be aware that all these teams have world class bowlers at their disposal,” he said.He explained that their next match against South Africa was a crucial one in deciding whether they qualify for the knockout phase of the competition.Lloyd said it was important for the West Indies to put the loss against Australia behind them.“South Africa are up next and while they haven’t performed to their ability, Windies have to be aware of the job at hand, as South Africa are in danger of missing out on the top four if they lose.“They now have to re-group, look at the mistakes they made and rectify them so that they can return to their winning ways. I’m still feeling positive about the West Indies overall,” Lloyd revealed.“West Indies have to get all the disciplines right on the day and play clever cricket because for the most part of the day (against Australia) they did well, but they simply did not capitalise on the early dismissals.”last_img read more