first_imgCheshire Home has reopened the doors to its library after almost 20 years.Peace Corps volunteer Elizabeth Rudd has been volunteering with Cheshire Home in Mahaica, East Coast Demerara; a home for people with disabilities.A resident of the Cheshire Home enjoying his time in the newly opened libraryWhen the committee expressed interest in re-opening the library, Rudd thought that it would be a great community resource, but also an excellent project for the residents to be a part of.The library was transformed over a four-month period as Rudd and five residents of the home cleaned, organised, repaired, and colour-coordinated the books.During the soft opening ceremony, Cheshire Home welcomed people from the village and neighbouring communities to join in the opening of the library.Rudd, alongside fellow volunteer Allee Schlitz, gave out fun gifts such as stickers and erasers to a group of excited students before reading popular children’s books such as Dora the Explorer and Frozen.Afterwards, students were able to explore the library, check out books and take free books home from the give-away shelf.“My favourite part of the event was when the students applauded the Cheshire Home residents’ hard work. The residents are so proud of themselves, but it’s the entire community that benefits when we promote the inclusion of people with disabilities,” Rudd said in an invited comment to Guyana Times.Schlitz, in a comment, recalled a moment with a young gentleman who was looking for a book on “Home Economics”. “He wants to be a chef when he gets older. It was great to see the students excited about books and I’m glad the library is here to spark interest in reading and support kids like this who have big dreams,” she stated.Three residents of the home are currently being trained as Librarian Assistants – learning job skills and gaining confidence in themselves in the process. They will be able to assist community members in locating books as well as keep the library organised.In addition, all three residents have excellent artistic capabilities and will continue to assist with the decoration of the library and the making of posters for future events.The library will be open the first two Saturdays of every month from 09:00h to 12:00h. There are books for all ages with special sections including autobiographies, self-help, and arts and crafts.If you are interested in becoming a volunteer librarian, please call Cheshire Home for details on telephone number 259-3454 or contact Rudd on 670-8480.last_img read more


first_imgScores of female Ebola survivors who are beneficiaries of a United Nations Children Fund (UNICEF) funded psychosocial support project have expressed mixed reactions upon hearing news that the project is coming to an end.The UNICEF funded project, titled, “Resilient Boosting for Children affected by EVD,” is a six month project that is implemented by two local organizations, Renewed Energy Serving Humanity (RESH) and Play to Live (PoL) with a US$196,000 grant. It comes to an end of this month.According to the supervisors of the survivors, Jessica T. K. Sampson, the project has helped to reignite the lives of the survivors, who are referred to as Project Associates (PAs), especially psychosocially, after their horrible experiences in the various Ebola Treatment Units (ETUs) in the country.During an experience sharing retreat at a resort in Monrovia, she said survivors were recruited and trained by RESH to provide Play and Therapy Services (P&TS) to children affected by the Ebola virus disease (EVD).The children, 857 in number, were placed into four categories; child survivors, those who lost their parents, and others living in communities that were heavily impacted by the EVD. This project, she said, “has made us one big family. We have gotten so used to the children and with each other that we now consider ourselves as one family.”She said the project has been great not so much for the money they were receiving, but the close bonds that have been created during the course of the project.“Some of our colleagues were neglected and discriminated against after they came out of the ETU, but we all have found solace in this place and found new bonds of friendship after some of our friends suffered rejection. We have found peace of mind and we cannot just see this coming to an end.”She said when they came out of the ETUs, some of them were constantly indoors crying, grieving over the horrible experiences they had been through, but the project brought some sense of relief to them.She pleaded with UNICEF for the continuation of the project, adding, “We want this project to continue so that we can have more impact on the children. Some of them lost their parents and became resentful and were traumatized but we have done a great job with them and they are responding positively. So if this comes to an abrupt end, we will not get the kind of results that we want.RESH founder and executive director, Ernest G. Smith said, “We all know that during the height of the crisis and thereafter, children’s development was hugely affected, with some of them losing their parents and others living in communities that were heavily affected. Children could not play any longer and we all know that play is an integral part of every child’s development.” RESH has also worked with 400 parents, of which 160 have been effectively trained under the project. “They were trained in child rights, child rearing and trauma awareness,” Mr. Smith, who described the project as successful, RESH Program Director, Praising Johnson said. Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more