first_imgMichael Juico. PBA IMAGESWangs Basketball coach Pablo Lucas is staying optimistic as his team awaits its fate in the 2017 PBA D-League Foundation Cup.“I hope so,” he said in Filipino when asked if he believes that his side can still make it to the quarterfinals. “The standings are still too close.”ADVERTISEMENT Kawhi Leonard, Clippers rally to beat Pelicans LATEST STORIES Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next 787 earthquakes recorded in 24 hours due to restive Taal Volcano Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks PLAY LIST 01:40Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks01:32Taal Volcano watch: Island fissures steaming, lake water receding02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite Indian national gunned down in Camarines Sur The Couriers missed a chance to clinch a quarterfinal seat as they suffered a monumental collapse against Marinerong Pilipino, 83-82, on Thursday to finish their eliminations campaign with an even 5-5 slate.But with victories over teams that are still in the thick of the race of the playoffs, Lucas has his reasons for keeping the faith even with Wangs’ outside chance.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSEnd of his agony? SC rules in favor of Espinosa, orders promoter heirs to pay boxing legendSPORTSRedemption is sweet for Ginebra, Scottie ThompsonSPORTSMayweather beats Pacquiao, Canelo for ‘Fighter of the Decade’Wangs Basketball beat Racal, 93-84, and topped Centro Escolar University, 88-87, but fell in close defeats to Batangas, 81-79, and Marinerong Pilipino.“It’s tough that we’re going to depend on the other teams, but it’s a good thing that we were able to invest in our five wins and in the end, we’re all be having identical records,” he said. O.J. Simpson asks parole board to set him free  MOST READ IT happens: Facebook sorry for Xi Jinping’s name mistranslation Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. View comments End of his agony? SC rules in favor of Espinosa, orders promoter heirs to pay boxing legend Marcosian mode: Duterte threatens to arrest water execs ‘one night’ ‘I’m out!’: PewDiePie releases last video before taking break from YouTube Lucas thinks that the Couriers’ tight losses will be beneficial for his crew if they do end up with a seat in the top six.“If we make it, I’m sure that the team will have a better run because we already learned our lessons. If we make it to the quarterfinals, I believe that we have a chance to advance to the semis,” he bragged.Nonetheless, Lucas is already content with what the team has achieved after setting a franchise-best record since it joined the PBA D-League in 2013, thanks largely to the contributions of guys like Robbie Herndon, Michael Juico, and Chris Bitoon.“This is already history for Wangs. We learned a lot in the years that we’ve joined and we can’t bring back the past, but we’re just hoping for the best,” he said.ADVERTISEMENT LeBron James scores 31 points, Lakers beat Rockets McGregor blasts Cerrone in 40 seconds in UFC returnlast_img read more


first_imgSeveral former managers of the Forestry Development Authority (FDA) on trial for illegally issuing sixty-one (61) Private Use Permits (PUPs) in the amount  of  US$6M were last Tuesday linked to “forging signatures” on the  community land  deeds that authorized logging companies to operate on 2.5 million hectares of farmland throughout the country.Thomas Doe Nah, a member of the Presidential Special Independent Investigation Body (SIIB), testified that representatives of the communities informed the SIIB that they did not know how the FDA awarded their lands to the companies for logging activities. It was based on a recommendation from the SIIB that the government dismissed and charged Moses Wogbeh, former managing director of the FDA, and three other managers and a senior surveyor of the Ministry of Land, Mines and Energy.The government is prosecuting them at Criminal Court ‘C,’ on multiple crimes including economic sabotage, criminal conspiracy, forgery and counterfeiting, obtaining and issuance of deceptive writings, obstruction of government functions by public servants.The defendants denied the charges when they were first arraigned before Judge Peter W. GbenewelehNah, who is the prosecution’s second witness and executive director of the Center for Transparency and Accountability of Liberia, a civil society group, alleged that the defendants did not get the approval of the land owners before awarding the contract to the logging companies to do business with the PUPs.“We conducted our investigation with those victimized communities about the FDA management’s handling of the PUPs, and they told us that they were not consulted and did not sign any deeds for companies to use their lands for logging purposes,” he explained.“We also found out that the signatures on the deeds believed to be those of the communities were forged by the defendants,” he added.Furthermore in his testimony, the witness named several communities in five of the 15 counties, whose signatures were allegedly forged on their land deeds by the defendants.   “We met with the effected communities in Grand Bassa, Rivercess, Grand Kru, Sinoe and Grand Gedeh and during our investigation they told us they were not consulted and did not give their land deeds to the FDA,” said Nah.Nah said representatives of the various communities told the SIIB that they did not know the terms and conditions of the PUP agreements between the FDA management and the logging companies.According to him, most of the communities they visited said they did not even know whether their lands have deeds.Concluding, Nah revealed that confirmation was also received from the FDA regional director that the verification memorandum which authorized the companies to operate in the communities was falsified and did not represent FDA interaction with the land owners.The case continues.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more


first_img“We need the perfect game. Juve are a killing machine. They are used to preparing for two important games in the space of a few days,” said Gattuso, whose side are sixth but within touching distance of the Champions League places.“They fear nothing and they will be focusing only on the game with us and they will start preparing for Real Madrid only after tomorrow.”Gattuso has turned around AC Milan since taking over late November with the former European giants notching up 25 points in 2018 — second only behind Juventus despite having a game in hand.“Juve have been unbeatable for the past six years and we are aware it’s a tough match but I am confident we’ll play a great game,” continued the former AC Milan midfielder.“The players who were away with their national teams managed to recharge their batteries and came back with more relaxed faces.“We really needed the break. I saw the boys in good condition in the past few days and they can’t wait to play this game. We hope to keep up the good work in this final part of the season.”“We are fully focused on the Juve game, there’s a lot at stake for both the teams. We can’t make any false step. We are in the running for an important achievement which was almost impossible a few months ago.”The match will also see former player Juventus ace Leonardo Bonucci return to Turin for the first time since exiting the club for Milan after clashing with coach Massimiliano Allegri.“It’s the first time Leo will be back in Turin as a Juve opponent and of course it’s going to be a particular feeling for him, but I saw him really focused,” said Gattuso who also revealed that summer signing Andrea Conti will undergo surgery on his left knee in the United States.The 24-year-old full-back was ruled out in September for sixth months with knee ligament damage with the Italian reinjuring the same knee in training.0Shares0000(Visited 2 times, 1 visits today) 0Shares0000Gennaro Gattuso says his AC Milan can stop the Juventus ‘Killing machine’ this weekend © AFP / Ben STANSALLTURIN, Italy, Mar 30 – Gennaro Gattuso warned AC Milan were ready to dismantle the Juventus ‘killing machine’ in their pursuit of Champions League football next season.Six-time champions Juventus are top of the standings and take on AC Milan Saturday three days before Real Madrid in the Champions League quarter-finals.last_img read more


first_imgPALMDALE – NASA Dryden Flight Research Center is expected to get work developing a launch-abort system, a parachute landing system and other components of America’s next-generation manned spacecraft, the center director said. Edwards Air Force Base has also been identified as the primary landing spot for the proposed Crew Exploration Vehicle, which will land by parachute like 1960s and 1970s space capsules – but on land, instead of in the ocean. “We’ve been a proven partner in the past,” Dryden director Kevin Petersen said Tuesday. “We expect that to happen in the future too.” The Crew Exploration Vehicle – competing versions of which are being designed by Boeing and a Northrop Grumman-Lockheed Martin team – is to replace the space shuttle for carrying Americans into space and will later be part of a system to return man to the moon. The present concept calls for the spacecraft to have the conical shape of the Apollo capsules that went to the moon in the 1960s and 1970s, but to be large enough to carry four to six people instead of three. The capsule is expected to be launched by a rocket developed from the space shuttle’s solid booster motors. For moon flights, the crew capsule would be carried into orbit by one rocket, and a second rocket would launch the propulsion unit that would take it on to the moon; the two segments would link up in orbit. Launching separately means the United States would not have to build a mammoth new rocket like the 300-foot-tall Saturn V that lifted the Apollo spacecraft. The new spacecraft is expected to fly beginning in about 2012 or 2014, and return astronauts to the moon by the end of that decade. “They’ll spend more time on the moon, actually set up an outpost there and learn to live on the moon,” Petersen said. Speaking at an Antelope Valley Board of Trade luncheon, Petersen said Dryden expects to design the new craft’s launch-abort system, which would allow it to set down safely if a problem occurs during launch. Three or four launches using a dummy spacecraft and the abort system are expected to be made out of White Sands, New Mexico. Dryden also is expected to do tests of the parachute system that will land the craft. The craft is expected to be equipped with inflatable cushions or retro rockets to soften its landing on Edwards’ Rogers Dry Lake, Petersen said. “We expect to be quite heavily involved with the landing and recovery of the new space vehicle,” Petersen said. Dryden may also play a role in testing heat shields, communication and navigation systems and other components, Petersen said. As in past research, Dryden will likely do work in partnerships with aerospace companies, universities, the Air Force or other government agencies. Besides testing the X-15 rocket planes and other aircraft, Dryden in the 1960s was home to a jet-powered lunar-lander trainer used by Neil Armstrong and other astronauts to practice for moon landings; hosted landing tests for the space shuttle; and installed shuttle landing gear in the belly of a jetliner to test how its tires would bear the weight. “We’ve been involved in human space flight for decades, for over four decades,” Petersen said. Charles F. Bostwick, (661) 267-5742 chuck.bostwick@dailynews.com AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORESanta Anita opens winter meet Saturday with loaded card160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more


first_imgSCORINGTDPATFGTP Pasadena10/14/20050101828 Mkryan,H.120 RECEIVINGRECYDSTD Alhambra09/09/20050101420 Temple City09/30/20050101424 Receiving Total234234 AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREBlues bury Kings early with four first-period goals 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! Aquino,E.1-4-4.00 Mares,J.1006 Clay,J.100000.00 Clay,J.120072 Martinez,S.117023 VS SCHOOLDateWLTPFPA Hoover11/11/20051003521 Paez,M.30018 Gill,J.1 South Pasadena09/23/2005100217 TOTAL2005280177262 Saleh,J.1006 Darmiento,A.1965534.5 Muir10/21/2005010026 Lemos,E.1 Interceptions Total7 Clay,J.25515075.912 Martinez,S.250 Darmiento,A.642334234102.71 Burbank10/07/20050102730 Tambidao.P.2320 Gonzalez,L.22014 Punting Total2274033.6 Molano,E.2136.50 Darmiento,A.31290.90 Mkryan,H.8283.50 Abramyan,A.2190 Passing Total652334234 RUSHINGTCBNYGAvg.TD Saleh,J.12564.71 Rushing Total46126425.722 Gharakhanian,D.22914.10 Ortiz,M.61451 RECORD: 2-8-0 Arcadia11/04/2005010628 PASSINGPAPCPIYDSTDRating Gonzalez,L.20773.92 Ortiz,M.52032 Paez,M.41372 Mares,J.3611 Clay,J.3220 Scoring Total26210177 Ortiz,M.514158.14 Archer,D.133.00 Martinez,S.27437.01 Lemus,E.284.00 PUNTINGNo.YDSAvg. Paez,M.391574.01 Martinez,S.38528.3 La Canada09/16/2005010734 INTERCEPTIONSNo. Martinez,S.4 Crescenta Valley10/28/20050103544 Leyba,W.3134.30 Rahimi,N.1217514.61 Darmiento,A.1 Rahimi,N.1006last_img read more


first_imgA view up the lake from the boathouse at Glenveagh Castle.A stunning November day at GlenveaghA view from the nature cabin up the lakeRounding the bend towards the castle and thinking of hot chocolate in the tea rooms!The lake is so calm that it’s difficult to even see the water unless you look closely.Another view from the boathouse up the lakeREFLECTIONS OF GLENVEAGH – PIC SPECIAL was last modified: November 24th, 2013 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:glenveagh national parkpic speciallast_img read more


first_imgRoyal and Prior Comprehensive School held their annual prize-giving on Friday last with special guests and special moments for all the students and staff. The ceremony is one of the highlights of the school year where staff take the opportunity to acknowledge the efforts and achievements of the students in the same academic year.A wonderful night was had by all, with teachers saying they are extremely proud of the many talents and successes of their students. Clive Wasson was in attendance to capture the night’s best moments.See below…Rev. Jonathan Cowan guest speaker at the Royal and Prior Comprehensive School Prize Distribution on Friday last. Photo Clive WassonJohn Eaton (Past Pupils Association) speaking at the Royal and Prior Comprehensive School Prize Distribution on Friday last. Photo Clive WassonJade McClafferty past pupils speaking at the Royal and Prior Comprehensive School Prize Distribution on Friday last. Photo Clive WassonHead Girl, Eleanor Duffy giving her report on Co-curricular Life of the School at the Royal and Prior Comprehensive School Prize Distribution on Friday last. Photo Clive WassonHead Boy, Charles Rodriguuez reporting on the Sporting Life of the School at the Royal and Prior Comprehensive School Prize Distribution on Friday last. Photo Clive WassonMatthew McGee, McDowell Cup (Shared) collects his prize from Rev. Jonathan Cowan at the Royal and Prior Comprehensive School Prize Distribution on Friday last. Photo Clive WassonJessica Campbell who received the Blake Award, Starritt Memorial Cup and Devenney Cup from Rev. Jonathan Cowan at the Royal and Prior Comprehensive School Prize Distribution on Friday last. Photo Clive WassonRev. Jonathan Cowan presenting Bethany Smyth with the Cookman Memorial Award, Bethany also won the Archdeacon Crooks Memorial Cup, The 400th Anniversary Award, The Prior Millennium Reunion Tropy ( Shared with Kellie McClafferty) and the Archdeacon Moore Cup at the Royal and Prior Comprehensive School Prize Distribution on Friday last. Photo Clive WassonHead Boy, Charles Rodriguez making a presention to Gladys Smith in recogniton of 40 years of service as school Secretray at the Royal and Prior Comprehensive School Prize Distribution on Friday last. Photo Clive WassonDr. Howard Welch giving the principal’s report at the Royal and Prior Comprehensive School Prize Distribution on Friday last. Photo Clive WassonParents and guests at the Royal and Prior Comprehensive School Prize Distribution on Friday last. Photo Clive WassonWinners of the special prizes for leaving cert at the Royal and Prior Comprehensive School Prize Distribution on Friday last. Seated from left are Jack King, Senior Cup Boys, Bethany Smyth, Archdeacon Crooks Memorial Cup, The 400th Anniversary Award, The Prior Millennium Reunion Tropy ( Shared with Kellie McClafferty) and the Archdeacon Moore Cup, Dr. Howard Welch, Principal, Mrs. Tara Cowan, Deputy Principal, Rev. Jonathan Cowan, Guest speaker, Revd Canon John Merrick, Chairman BOM, Jessica Campbell, Blake Award, Starritt Memorial Cup, Devenney Cup and Cian Alcorn, Best Practicle Piece Leaving Cert. Back from left Jordan Gallagher, Elliott Cup, , Conor Bowe, Leaving Cert Award, Gavin Chen, Pinkerton Cup, Jade McClafferty, Leaving Cert Prize, Kim Laird, Milling Cup, 1975 Reunion Cup, Jordan Devenney, Raffan Memorial Cup, Niamh Merrick, Leaving Cert Prize, Wilson Craig, Crawford, Trophy, , Alana Ashe, Gilbert Gault Memorial Cup, Torin Laszcziw, Royal School House Prize, Ciara Stewart, Senior Cup Girls, Erica McClinotck, Special Attendance Award, and April Baird, McNamara Award Photo Clive WassonSecond year prize winners at the Royal and Prior Comprehensive School Prize Distribution on Friday last with from left Dr. Howard Welch, Principal, Rev. Jonathan Cowan, Guest speaker, Revd Canon John Merrick, Chairman BOM and Mrs. Tara Cowan, Deputy Principal, Photo Clive WassonThird year prize winners at the Royal and Prior Comprehensive School Prize Distribution on Friday last with from left Dr. Howard Welch, Principal, Rev. Jonathan Cowan, Guest speaker, Revd Canon John Merrick, Chairman BOM and Mrs. Tara Cowan, Deputy Principal, Photo Clive WassonFourth year prize winners at the Royal and Prior Comprehensive School Prize Distribution on Friday last with from left Dr. Howard Welch, Principal, Rev. Jonathan Cowan, Guest speaker, Revd Canon John Merrick, Chairman BOM and Mrs. Tara Cowan, Deputy Principal, Photo Clive WassonJordan Devenny, winer of the Raffan Memoiral Cup for Engineering /Construction with his father Alan Devenney at the Royal and Prior Comprehensive School Prize Distribution on Friday last. Photo Clive WassonSisters and 6th Year Prize Winners, Jessica Duffy and Eleanor Duffy at the Royal and Prior Comprehensive School Prize Distribution on Friday last. Photo Clive WassonSixth year prize winners at the Royal and Prior Comprehensive School Prize Distribution on Friday last with from left Dr. Howard Welch, Principal, Rev. Jonathan Cowan, Guest speaker, Revd Canon John Merrick, Chairman BOM and Mrs. Tara Cowan, Deputy Principal, Photo Clive WassonFifth year prize winners at the Royal and Prior Comprehensive School Prize Distribution on Friday last with seated Dr. Howard Welch, Principal, Rev. Jonathan Cowan, Guest speaker, Revd Canon John Merrick, Chairman BOM and Mrs. Tara Cowan, Deputy Principal. Photo Clive Wasson Picture Special: Proud moments at Royal and Prior School prize-giving was last modified: October 23rd, 2019 by Shaun KeenanShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more


first_imgQPR midfielders Joey Barton and Jordon Mutch return from injury for the game against Stoke and Eduardo Vargas makes his full debut. Armand Traore starts, while Sandro is absent. Stoke are without Jon Walters, who has a calf problem. Peter Crouch plays against his former club. QPR: Green; Isla, Caulker, Ferdinand, Traore: Barton; Mutch, Fer, Kranjcar; Vargas, Austin.Subs: McCarthy, Phillips, Onuoha, Henry, Zamora, Dunne, Hoilett. Stoke: Begovic; Bardsley, Shawcross, Wilson, Pieters; Whelan, Nzonzi; Diouf, Adam, Moses; Crouch.Subs: Sorensen, Huth, Muniesa, Arnautovic, Sidwell, Assaidi, Bojan.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more


first_imgThe emotional reaction to scientific ideas can change depending on the words used.  Can words manipulate public opinion?    “Wording matters,” said Jonathon Schuldt [U of Michigan] in a press release posted on PhysOrg.  His team found that opinion polls yielded a 16% difference among Republicans depending on whether they were asked if global warming or climate change was a big problem.  The responses might also vary depending on the temperature of the day they were asked.  Democrats, unexpectedly, showed less divergence, the majority showing concern for both terms; this was attributed to a “ceiling effect” (from an already high level of belief), “Or it could be that Democrats’ beliefs about global climate change might be more crystallized, and as a result, more protected from subtle manipulations.”    On the BBC News, Erika Wright tackled the problem of “spaghettification” of scientific jargon: “Scientists use language to give authority to their work, but if the words become jargon, they can end up alienating the audience instead of convincing them,” the subtitle said.  An example is the phrase, double-blind randomized controlled trials, which sounds self-contradictory.  How can something be random and yet controlled?    Scientists can hype their own image with jargon, too: when a scientist uses the word derma for skin, “It invests the product with a certain authority that it wouldn’t otherwise have,” Barry Delaney, an advertising consultant quoted by Wright, said.  He pointed to other examples like using poly- as a prefix for everything, or always condensing phrases into acronyms.  His humorous example: MYFB for “makes you feel better,” which is sometimes all that acronyms do.  “Mystification is the name of the game,” Delaney remarked (see equivocation).    The history of science provides examples of pragmatic analogies and metaphors that may or may not contribute to understanding.  When electricity was not understood, words like flow and current tried to make it seem like water, something familiar.  More recently, quantum mechanical properties have included spin, something humans can visualize, but which has nothing to do with the actual physical effect, Wright explained.  “So instead of helping us by applying familiar words, the subtle differences just leave us more confused,” she pointed out.  Yet neologisms (new words) unrelated to experience can also confuse.    Unexplained by Wright was why she believed it is the job of scientists to “convince” people of their “authority” instead of “alienating” them.  Isn’t that the skill set for politicians?  In the global warming article, Norbert Schwartz, a colleague of Schuldt, noted the effect of “framing” an argument by word choice: “When the issue is framed as global warming, the partisan divide is nearly 42 percentage points,” he said; “But when the frame is climate change, the partisan divide drops to about 26 percentage points.”  The press release said, “The good news is that Americans may not be as polarized on the issue as previously thought.”  But that’s a value judgment, not a scientific finding.  It’s conceivable to imagine times when polarization is good news.    PhysOrg described a physiology professor who conjures up Batman as a teaching aid.  Professor E. Paul Zehr [U of Victoria, BC] “uses Batman to establish a framework, grounded in his fictional universe as well as our real one, in order to discuss the various components of exercise and physical training and illustrate how the body’s physiological systems respond,” the article said.  “His experiences in teaching undergraduate courses in physiology and neurophysiology made him realize that connecting science to popular culture helped students understand the lessons better.”Metaphors and analogies can be effective teaching tools, but they carry the risk of dragging in extra baggage that can mislead.  Is your knowledge of physiology enhanced by watching a movie of a caped hero with super powers?    How is electricity like a flowing liquid?  Do you understand quantum mechanics better by visualizing spinning balls?  How else would you visualize an incomprehensible phenomenon?  What words would you use?  What happens when a scientific phenomenon has political and economic implications, like “climate change”?    Science is not value-neutral.  Scientists are human beings with emotions and biases of their own.  They often want more respect than their fellow human beings simply because they are scientists.  Respect in any profession must be earned, not assumed.  In many cases it is earned by scientists, but we have seen over and over that some scientific explanations for phenomena (especially evolution), when stripped of jargon, amount to little more than “stuff happens.”  A bum could say that.    What is most worrisome is when scientists take up the political banner and try to convince the public and the government on policy decisions based on their presumed authority.  When it fails, and they try to “frame” their arguments for best effect, they have left the science lab.  At that point their opinions deserve no more rights than those of any other member of the public.  Ideally, their findings should be simply published as factually as possible.  It is the job of policy analysts to determine which scientific facts merit attention in political positions, and for voters to weigh the merits of the arguments.    Those ideals are visionary, of course.  In practice, we know, scientists are not value-neutral; they are subject to motivations and pressures, and tend to see everything they do as important.  Facts can be co-opted for both sides of a debate.  An informed public with critical thinking skills is vital to avoid unthoughtful action nudged by the “framing” rhetoric of scientists and other politicians.    “Climate change” is a recent egregious example.  When “global warming” took heat after Climategate, scientists quickly migrated to climate change as their pet phrase.  It’s clever, because it’s irrefutable.  No matter what happens, they can’t lose.  If the climate gets hotter, they win.  If it gets colder, they win.  If it doesn’t change at all, they still win, because zero is a valid number on a scale of change.  Subconsciously, everybody knows what they are talking about (liberalism, cap-and-trade, carbon footprint, UN sanctions, global summits, drastic effects on the economy, apocalyptic scenarios), but the phrase hedges their bets by sounding so innocuous nobody could be against it (see 03/08/2011 and comments on Evolution News about NPR’s way of reporting the issue).  Evolutionary rhetoric is rife with similar rhetorical tricks (see the 02/02/2011 entry, “Metaphors of Evolution”).    The primrose path is an apt metaphor; it’s prim, it’s rosy, it’s a path – a tempting route, especially when the pied piper of science calls.  Wise people choose their paths based on the destination.(Visited 9 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more


first_img6 October 2009South Africa’s Standard Bank has signed a US$150-million (about R1.1-billion) loan agreement with the Japan Bank for International Cooperation (JBIC) in order to boost trade finance in Africa.The deal was signed by Standard Bank Group CEO Jacko Maree and JBIC president and CEO Hiroshi Watanabe in Istanbul, Turkey this week, during the annual meeting of the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund.African growth, developmentThe loan is the first transaction between Standard Bank and JBIC, the international arm of the Japanese government-owned Japan Finance Corporation. It is also their first trade facility programme transaction in Africa.“This transaction is significant for Africa as Japan remains an important and strategic trade partner and JBIC can work with us towards our joint goal of supporting economic growth and development in Africa,” Maree said in a statement this week.“It is good for Africa, the region and Standard Bank. These funds will enable us to increase the flow of trade into and out of Africa.”Japanese investment in AfricaDuring the Fourth Tokyo International Conference on African Development in May 2008, the Japanese government announced that JBIC would provide financial support totalling up to $2.5-billion to Africa over a five-year period, with the aim of doubling Japanese private sector investment to Africa.The Standard Bank loan will be used to facilitate trade finance in South Africa and other African countries.It will also serve as a platform for future cooperation between Standard Bank and JBIC across a range of different banking products and geographies.SAinfo reporterWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more